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Saving for Children Guide

 

Setting up a bare trust

If you decide to set up a bare trust to hold investment trust shares for your child, a trustee (or trustees) is named as legal owner of the shares with your child the beneficiary of them.

The trustee can be a different person from the person who is giving the shares to the child. The trustee is the person who will be responsible for looking after the investment on the child’s behalf.

It is important to remember that a trust is a legal structure, which will differ slightly depending on whether you set it up in Scotland or in England and Wales. The main difference is that children can gain access to bare trusts at the age of 16 in Scotland, and 18 in England or Wales. If you are worried about any of the implications of setting up a bare trust, you should consult a solicitor or qualified tax advisor.

Establishing a bare trust is very simple. You will need to complete a ‘declaration of trust’ form, which the investment manager you choose to invest with can provide to you. You should consider who will be the trustee – possibly one of the parents – and whether you wish to appoint a second trustee in case the first dies before the trust becomes available to the child.

To find an adviser qualified to advise about trusts, contact the Society of Trust and Estate Practitioners Worldwide: www.step.org or 020 7838 4890.

 
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Data provided by FE fundinfo. Care has been taken to ensure that the information is correct, but FE fundinfo neither warrants, represents nor guarantees the contents of information, nor does it accept any responsibility for errors, inaccuracies, omissions or any inconsistencies herein. Past performance does not predict future performance, it should not be the main or sole reason for making an investment decision. The value of investments and any income from them can fall as well as rise.

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